Methi Parantha/paratha or whole flatbread made with fenugreek leaves, garlic and carrom seeds

Methi Parnatha/ Wholewheat Fenugreek Flatbread

Living in Dallas has its perks. One of them is that we don’t have to drive 4 hours to get indian groceries and indian produce. Even though we still have to drive 30 minutes for indian groceries (since all the stores are in the suburbs and we stay close to downtown Dallas), it still beats a 4 hour drive.

On our recent trip to the indian store I picked up some fresh fenugreek leaves. I use dried fenugreek leaves (kasoori methi) all the time in my cooking.  A tbsp of dried leaves, briefly rubbed between palms and then tossed into a curry gives a lovely flavor to gravies- and that’s why I always use them in my butter chicken and dal makhani recipe.

Fenugreek seeds are another way to get that sweet yet slightly bitter flavor to a dish. When adding seeds to a dish, add them in the beginning and use them sparingly and also make sure not to burn them as then they become very bitter and might spoil the taste of your dish. Using a combination of both- seeds and kasoori methi will give you the best results, especially when making butter chicken.

methi parathas

While I love cooking with fenugreek seeds and dried leaves, when I get my hands on fresh leaves, methi parantha is my favorite way to enjoy this herb. And I found out from my facebook post, a favorite of many others. Its popularity is completely deserved.

Parantha/Paratha is an unleavened indian flatbread made with whole wheat flour. They are not as thick as a naan, but not as thin as a roti- with their thickness lying somewhere in between. There are many variations of parantha. It could be stuffed with vegetables, aloo parantha being a popular stuffed variation  or it could be plain. If there is one meal I could eat morning evening and night- it would be paranthas. After all, I am from Punjab, and our paranthas are very dear to us.

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Green Tea

Tea is huge now. Even though as a kid I never enjoyed tea, I am now a big fan of it. And green tea is generally what I prefer, though, come winters, I don’t mind a cup of masala chai to warm my body.

A massive amount of tea is consumed each and every day in all corners of the world. Forget coffee — its production may be greater, but as a Springer study found three cups of tea are drunk for every cup of coffee, thus tea seems to be the preferred choice over a cup of java.

Not convinced? Consider this: according to a reputable UK-based digital bingo operator that specializes in having live callers, 31% of people in the UK drink five or more cups of tea a day, with the large majority of tea drinkers having their first cup at the age of 5. That’s not all — the UK isn’t even among the top 3 tea-consuming countries in the world, as China, Turkey and Ireland are the biggest tea lovers in the world. And here I thought Indians would have made the top list. My family is big on tea and their day doesn’t begin if they haven’t sipped on at least two cups of tea before breakfast. The count is even more when the whole family is together.

Green Tea

While I generally drink my tea, lately I have seen recipes where tea isn’t just used as a beverage. Tea leaves themselves can be used for spice rubs on meat and poultry. Steep them in hot water and you have a brew for everything from soups and grain dishes to sauces and marinades.

Some people even swear by green tea facials, and many people have incorporated the leaves into moisturizing products by extracting its medicinal properties. Other than soothing sunburn and delaying the signs of aging, a simple green tea bag can even help treat nasty bug bites! I use my used cold tea bags to combat puffy eyes and it always works.

Green Tea

I am still experimenting with recipes using tea but for today, though, I will share some I found interesting and that you can try at home.

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Basil and Parmesan Spelt BreadBasil and Parmesan Spelt Bread

I know I am not doing a good job of keeping the blog going these days but I am hoping this gets corrected soon because while I am not blogging, I have been cooking and trying new recipes out and the pending post lists just keeps growing.

I realized I have not posted a new bread recipe for some time now, so today thought of sharing this basil and parmesan spelt bread recipe that I tried recently.

Its an adaption of the whole wheat bread recipe I have posted before. Instead of whole wheat flour I used spelt flour and wheat germ in this bread. I love spelt flour and while mellower in taste than whole wheat, some claim it to be healthier. According to various health sites, Spelt is high in vitamin B2, niacin, manganese, thiamin, copper, and magnesium. There are varying arguments though on whether spelt is more nutritious than whole wheat, but it still has its share of nutrition and is great if you are making a switch from regular flour to more wholesome grains. Also, the greater solubility of spelt protein makes it easier to digest than wheat, and thus making the nutrients more easily available to your body.

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