Tag Archives: Food

(This is Post 2 in the series Cooking with the Books.)

So I wasn’t going to bake.

I had already decided I am not sending anything with V for tomorrow’s Office Thursdays. I have a cake to bake tomorrow (it’s my friend’s daughter’s birthday), so I thought I will get my baking fix with the birthday cake. So I really don’t need another cake lurking around.

Plus, it was my rest day. I had cooked plenty yesterday, making sure I had no cooking to do today. The refrigerator was well stocked with ready to serve food. The kitchen was clean, more importantly the sink was clean. I really did not want to do any dishes today. I had just finished doing laundry and I couldn’t be bothered with doing any other housework. So I decided V will go empty handed for Office Thursdays. Everyone will understand. Its not like its set in stone or something. =/

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We have been talking too much savory around here on the blog. It’s time to get the sweet stuff out!

I saw this cake on Foodgawker (those sinners, corrupting the minds of us who are always struggling with our weight) and well, I just had to make the cake. Alison just describes it so well, that I knew the recipe had to be tested out.

But I didn’t want to make cake.

I wanted to make cupcakes.

Why?

Well, because they are just fun.

Fun to look at.

Fun to eat.

And fun to share!

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I generally cook north indian food (mainly with a Punjabi touch) at home but absolutely love south Indian food.

Northern cuisine has been greatly influenced by the Mughals with the rich butter laden curries, but it is in the cuisine of the south that you can see the use of the spices that India is famous for. Probably because it is in the south that these spices are actually grown.

South Indian cuisine is quite different from the cooking of Northern India. The cuisine of the Southern Indian states – Tamil Nadu and Andhra Pradesh on the east coat, Karnataka and Kerala on the west coast – use such old cooking techniques that are still widely practiced, with contemporary refinements, today.

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